User talk:John P. Sadowski (NIOSH)

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DYK for Hazard substitution

Updated DYK query.svg On 2 May 2017, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Hazard substitution, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that substitution of a hazardous chemical can backfire if it turns out to be a "regrettable substitution" that unwittingly introduces a new hazard? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Hazard substitution. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Hazard substitution), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Mifter (talk) 01:12, 2 May 2017 (UTC)

DYK for Toilet plume

Updated DYK query.svg On 9 June 2017, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Toilet plume, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that there is indirect, but unconfirmed, evidence of certain diseases being spread by toilet plume? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Toilet plume. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Toilet plume), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Vanamonde (talk) 00:02, 9 June 2017 (UTC)

DYK for Tapered element oscillating microbalance

Updated DYK query.svg On 20 July 2017, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Tapered element oscillating microbalance, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that personal dust monitors required for coal miners by the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration are based on the tapered element oscillating microbalance? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Tapered element oscillating microbalance. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Tapered element oscillating microbalance), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Alex ShihTalk 12:02, 20 July 2017 (UTC)

DYK for Health and safety hazards of nanomaterials

Updated DYK query.svg On 26 July 2017, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Health and safety hazards of nanomaterials, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that in animal studies of the health and safety hazards of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes had similar inhalation exposure effects to asbestos? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Health and safety hazards of nanomaterials. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Health and safety hazards of nanomaterials), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Alex ShihTalk 12:03, 26 July 2017 (UTC)

DYK for Radioactive nanoparticle

Updated DYK query.svg On 2 August 2017, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Radioactive nanoparticle, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that radioactive nanoparticles are being investigated as a treatment for cancer? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Radioactive nanoparticle. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Radioactive nanoparticle), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 00:03, 2 August 2017 (UTC)

DYK for Occupational epidemiology

Alex ShihTalk 00:04, 30 August 2017 (UTC)

DYK for Titanium dioxide nanoparticle

Updated DYK query.svg On 9 October 2017, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Titanium dioxide nanoparticle, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that titanium dioxide nanoparticles prevent cancer when used in sunscreens, but may cause it if inhaled by production workers? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Titanium dioxide nanoparticle. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Titanium dioxide nanoparticle), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 02:31, 9 October 2017 (UTC)

Graphene

Could I ask you some more informations about graphene? I don’t understand some cardinals point Eugeniocazzo (talk) 23:26, 16 October 2017 (UTC)

@Eugeniocazzo: Sure, I'll try to help answer any questions!

Thank you. Well firstly I don’t understand how the structure of a material can change its properties: if i take one atom layer of gold it has the same properties as if I had taken a block of it, right ? But then graphene doesn’t follow this logic because from my understanding if you take only one atom layer of graphite you get a layer of graphene ( please correct me if I’m being completely wrong ). Second question - while reading about graphene properties I found out that 10 one atom layer of graphene could stop most common bullet fired from even quite powerful shotguns, if so how is this possible? We wouldn’t even be able do see such thin “walls” and yet they would be able to stop such a strong impact, it doesn’t make sense for what concerns current physic. Excuse me for the badly written english but I’m not a native speaker. Hoping to understand a little more about graphene. Eugeniocazzo (talk) 15:44, 23 November 2017 (UTC)

DYK for Engineering controls for nanomaterials

Updated DYK query.svg On 26 January 2018, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Engineering controls for nanomaterials, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that low-turbulence enclosures developed for the pharmaceutical industry are also suitable as engineering controls for nanomaterials? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Engineering controls for nanomaterials. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Engineering controls for nanomaterials), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Alex Shih (talk) 00:03, 26 January 2018 (UTC)


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